Obdormio.com Unwasted Hours

8 March, 2012

Luddism Vindicated

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — Obdormio @ 00:00

As I believe I have mentioned before, I am a big fan of George R.R. Martin’s book series, A Song of Ice and Fire. In that same mention, I said that I also enjoyed the HBO adaptation of those books, Game of Thrones. The second season starts in April, and I am all a-jitter with excitement for it, but what concerns me right now is the first season, which has just been released on DVD and blu-ray.

Now, I knew damn well that I’d end up getting this anyway, so I saw no reason to wait. Since I am currently suffering a bad cold, I thought I’d buy the set and spend the evening vegetating in front of the screen consuming commentaries and extra features. The question was: DVD or blu-ray?

Up until now, I have stuck with DVDs. My old DVD player still functions, my laptop has a DVD and no blu-ray drive, and it’s not like I have a TV that shows high definition anyway. In this case, however, I thought it might be time to take the first step into the future everybody else seems to have joined three years ago. The blu-ray set had more extra content than the DVD, people who notice such things say the image quality is markedly better on the blu-ray, and the price difference between the two was only 40 kroner (presently about 7 US dollars, or 5 euros, or 54 rand). Although I have no blu-ray player myself, there is a Playstation 3 in this apartment, which I understand can quite adequately perform the function.

So, overcoming my Luddite instincts, I strode boldly into the technological present, purchased the kind of disappointingly slim box and marched home through the wind and rain, coughing all the way, imagining the fun to come.

Unfortunately, the TV in this apartment remains steadfastly in the technological past.

Now, I’m not a complete idiot, I knew I wasn’t going to get the full HD blu-ray experience on an old SDTV, but I figured I’d at least get the same level as I get from DVDs. And indeed, my googling these past thirty minutes support me in this notion, but the actual experience says otherwise. The disc played, all right, but it played in black and white, all colour drained from it.

I’m not sure where the fault is here. This is a localized edition of the box, so I assume any NTSC/PAL-discrepancies have already been sorted. The Playstation menu displays colour normally; until the actual disk is activated, there’s no problem at all. The various wires and cables are all thoroughly plugged in, I have made sure of that, at least. I’ve fiddled around with various settings, and tried to adjust every variable I found, but to no avail, there’s just simply no colour.

Guess I should have gone with Casablanca.

I suspect the problem lies somewhere in the Playstation, as I dragged out my own little TV from its storage and tested that with the same result, but in truth it could as easily be a problem the two TVs share; neither of them are exactly fresh off the conveyor belt. I’d have to try with a different player to be sure, and I don’t, as previously mentioned, have one.

So do I regret getting the blu-ray over the DVD?  No, not really. All my reasons for going with it still stand, and in the long-term I think it will work out. Sooner or later I’ll end up buying an actual player for the darned things, and at some point after that I’ll probably own a TV of a more recent make, and live happily until the format changes again.

But it did spoil my plans for the evening.

26 January, 2012

Games of Thrones

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , — Obdormio @ 00:00

I have been playing the Game of Thrones board game for many years now. I would also describe myself as a big fan of the books, though I have not yet gotten around to reading the most recent one, and I eagerly look forwards to the next season of the TV adaptation, but the board game was my entry point into the franchise. I think it’s fair to call it my favourite board game. Two expansions exist for it, A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords, though I only have the first one myself. I have tried the second one, but did not really care for it as much.

The game came out in a second edition not too long ago, incorporating several of the expansion features in the core game, and with all new artwork. Before Christmas, I ogled the box in the store, considering purchasing it to replace my trusty old first edition, but decided not to at the time. I recently had the opportunity to play it, and while I did enjoy it, it convinced me that not buying it was the correct decision simply because what is new in it isn’t different enough from what I already have to buy it again.

That sounded very negative; let me try again by looking at the differences instead, and giving my opinion on them. As I am not too familiar with the Storm of Swords expansion, I am not entirely sure which features are taken from that and which are brand new, but I will try to navigate it as best I can.

The most obvious change from the old edition is the new artwork, and mainly the new board. The whole map has been redrawn, and the data tracks along its side have been redesigned. The new map is darker than the old one, and looks slightly more … realistic, I suppose is the word. The labels on the various areas are smaller, and in my opinion each area felt more crowded. While it is a very pretty map, I think I prefer the old one, as I find it clearer – clarity being more important than photorealism during a game. In addition, the new game pieces are not solidly coloured in the new edition, and I found that they could easily end up disappearing on the board, blending too well in with the map.

On the plus side, the map now incorporates the ports from the Clash of Kings expansion, printed right on the map; a big improvement from the port tokens of the old edition. It also uses the expanded south from the same expansion, letting the game support six players from the get-go. These are great advantages, in my opinion. While the borders have been redrawn, I think it is only general shapes which have changed, not which areas border which, so the game balance has not changed. The redesigned data tracks also look good, and the addition of a victory track made it easier to spot who was approaching a win. All these things I liked.

All the tokens have been given a new look as well. I liked the tokens for neutral forces, and the way they incorporated information on when they were to be used on them. I did not so much care for the new Order and Power tokens, which seemed to me both darker in hue and less crisp, and even smaller in size than the old ones. I also prefer the old Messenger Raven token to the new one. The House Start Cards have been done away with entirely, replaced with the new House Screens, which were perhaps my favourite innovation in the new edition – they were much more useful as a reference and useful for hiding your tokens from your opponents. They also looked very nice.

There are some new cards, as well. The House cards have been replaced – or at least, they are not the cards from either the base game or the Clash of Kings expansion. It is possible they are based on cards found in A Storm of Swords. In any case, the mechanic is the same as ever, and the new cards work well enough, though I did not examine all of them. There is a new deck, the Wildling Deck, which I have been told is also a Storm of Swords feature, which alter the outcome of a wildling attack. This adds an element of unpredictability to wildling attacks, which I can appreciate; it makes gambling on the outcome of an attack more risky, and also makes the Raven token more valuable, as its owner can peek ahead at the next card in this deck. The wildlings now attack automatically upon reaching their full strength, rather than waiting for the card that unleashes them, a mechanic than can potentially lead to more frequent attacks. They are also not reduced to zero if they win, but simply lowered one space. All in all, it seems attrition from wildling attacks is much more likely in this edition

An element of unpredictability I did not care as much for were the new Tide of Battle cards, which I believe are a second edition innovation. Drawn at the end of a combat, they add a random number to each side’s combat strength, as well as sword or fortification icons. They also include the possibility of immediately killing one of the opponents forces outright, win or lose. I appreciate that many people enjoy a random element, and as seen above I like it myself on occasion, but the iron clad predictability of the combat mechanic has always been one of the main selling points of Game of Thrones for me. With full knowledge of your opponents forces, and which cards he might potentially hold, it all comes down to the tactics of the situation (no boon for me, really; I am a dreadful tactician), and the support you can persuade neighbouring armies to give you. I understand that the Tide of Battle cards encourage gambits in play, and increase attrition further, but I remain sceptical. I believe they are an optional rule, however, so the game could still be played without them, if you can find a group who agrees.

Finally, a word about some of the rules changes. With the increased attrition, it was nice to be able to muster at will using the starred Consolidate Power order, and it was an order I found myself placing often. I am still a bit ambivalent about it though, the rarity of the mustering card and the potential wait between each appearance of it gave each game a unique flavour – you could end up with every unit on the board within a few rounds, or you could go the whole game eking out existence with the bare minimum of troops. Overall, though, I think this might be a good change. The change of the starred Raid order – no longer capable of two raids, but instead empowered to remove a defence order – did not really come up during our game, so I have no idea how that change plays out.

Some of the Westeros cards have been replaced with cards where the holders of the three great tokens decide the effect – choosing for instance between a mustering, a supply count or no effect at all. This also makes the great tokens more valuable, increasing the reward for bidding high when the opportunity arises, and I have no objection towards that. The garrisons now protecting each of the players home bases are also an interesting and welcome touch.

The final change I can think of is the change in four player games – Tyrell has become a neutral force, while Greyjoy becomes the fourth player. This means that the pressure normally faced between Greyjoy, Lannister and Stark in a five player game is maintained in a four player game, making the riverlands hotly contested from the very beginning. To compensate for the now wide open south, a large number of neutral forces are placed there, but even with the presence of these, it seems to me that Lannister and Baratheon have a fairly free range to mop up a great many castles virtually unopposed unless Greyjoy and Stark work together for much of the game.

I’ve gone on for too long now, so I’ll wrap up. As I said, I do not think I will be purchasing the second edition, simply because the changes made alone are not worth the price of admission, given that I already have the first game. The changes that I liked the most can easily be applied to the old game without too much effort – in the case of the altered star orders, no effort at all! I think I can make my own house screens, and maybe even new neutral force and garrison tokens if I really want some.

A Game of Thrones: The Board Game is an excellent game, and it remains an excellent game in its second edition, and for those who do not have the first edition – or even those who have the first edition but none of the expansions – it would certainly be worth the money.

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